More Christmas Trivia

Travels with Harley

If you follow our Travels with Harley blog, you would have learned a few interesting things about Christmas that you probably didn’t know. After a little digging, Travels with Harley has come up with a few more interesting tid bits about Christmas that you may not be aware of.

ice-exhibit-277358_960_720

Frosty the Snowman didn’t start his life out as the lead character in a song or a TV series. In fact, Frosty the Snowman wasn’t something associated with kids at all. Frosty the Snowman was the brainchild of an ad executive back in 1890 that used Frosty the Snowman to market whiskey. Frosty was brought back to life after prohibition when he began to appear in ads for Schlitz, Jack Daniels, and Chivas Regal.

Travels with Harley

Although American children place stockings on the mantle or elsewhere if there is no fireplace, Dutch children expect Santa Claus to fill their shoes with extra special gifts.

One of the most popular Christmas songs, Jingle Bells, was actually first written for Thanksgiving. Written in 1957 by songwriter James Pierpont, the song was originally called One Horse Open Sleigh. So popular was the tune at Thanksgiving that people started to sing it during Christmas as well.

Travels with Harley

Located in the King’s Canyon National Park in California, the United States first national Christmas tree is aptly named the, “General Grant Tree,” and measures more than 300 feet tall. Officially named the national tree in 1925, the General is a giant sequoia.

The Christmas turkey wasn’t always the star of the holiday dinner in the UK. In fact, Roast turkey didn’t become a popular menu item until about 1851 when it replaced the traditional Christmas dinner entrée, roast swan. However, the Royal Family enjoyed the ever popular Boars head as the main course for a few more decades.

Travels with Harley

 

Christmas is full of symbols, with the humble Candy Cane being one of the most popular and one of the most controversial. Some say the Candy Cane originally dates back to the year 1670 in Europe and signifies the shape of the hook that Jesus used to shepherd his sheep with the red and white stripes indicating purity and the sacrifice of Christ. However according to some the significance of the Candy Cane remains the same, but was created by a candy maker in Illinois.