More Little Known Christmas Facts

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Before Travels with Harley gets into our last blog about Christmas facts, Jim and Demea would like to wish everyone a very Merry Christmas, and an even Happier New Year. Now, let’s get back to the things that you didn’t know about Christmas.

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Leave it to the Scandinavians, most notably the Norwegian scientists, who have come up with a hypothesis that Rudolph’s cherry red nose is most probably the result of an unfortunate parasitic infection coming from his respiratory system. If you have been reading our little known Christmas facts, you will know that couldn’t possibly be the case. One thing that Travels with Harley didn’t tell you was that Montgomery Ward almost gave Rudolph a different colored nose as the top brass thought that the public would perceive Rudolph as a drunkard.

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The biggest Christmas stocking in the world measured in at 106 feet plus another 9 inches long and a massive 49 feet and an inch wide. Weighing as much as five of Santa’s reindeer, the largest Christmas stocking on the planet was stuffed with nearly 1,000 gifts and was made in London by the Children’s Society on December 14 in 2007.

The British, Australians and other Commonwealth countries open their Christmas Crackers, also known as Bon Bons, which are tubes wrapped up in paper with prizes inside on Christmas Day during Christmas lunch, brunch, or dinner. Once popped open, yes they make a sound much like a firecracker, the Christmas Crackers contain everything from toys to paper crowns that dinner guests wear during the Christmas meal.

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The gorgeous poinsettia plants that adorn homes all over the world are actually native to Mexico, and although it is considered poisonous, it is not. However, holy berries are. The poinsettia was originally cultivated by the Aztecs. The Aztecs called it Cuetlaxochitl, which translates to, “Flower which wilts.” The plants color symbolizes purity and was quite often used to help reduce fever.

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President Theodore Roosevelt was a vocal environmentalist and in 1901, forbid live Christmas Trees in the White House.

This Christmas be kind to your friends and family and don’t forget to remember why we celebrate. Merry Christmas to all, and as they say, to all a good night…

More Christmas Trivia

Travels with Harley

If you follow our Travels with Harley blog, you would have learned a few interesting things about Christmas that you probably didn’t know. After a little digging, Travels with Harley has come up with a few more interesting tid bits about Christmas that you may not be aware of.

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Frosty the Snowman didn’t start his life out as the lead character in a song or a TV series. In fact, Frosty the Snowman wasn’t something associated with kids at all. Frosty the Snowman was the brainchild of an ad executive back in 1890 that used Frosty the Snowman to market whiskey. Frosty was brought back to life after prohibition when he began to appear in ads for Schlitz, Jack Daniels, and Chivas Regal.

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Although American children place stockings on the mantle or elsewhere if there is no fireplace, Dutch children expect Santa Claus to fill their shoes with extra special gifts.

One of the most popular Christmas songs, Jingle Bells, was actually first written for Thanksgiving. Written in 1957 by songwriter James Pierpont, the song was originally called One Horse Open Sleigh. So popular was the tune at Thanksgiving that people started to sing it during Christmas as well.

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Located in the King’s Canyon National Park in California, the United States first national Christmas tree is aptly named the, “General Grant Tree,” and measures more than 300 feet tall. Officially named the national tree in 1925, the General is a giant sequoia.

The Christmas turkey wasn’t always the star of the holiday dinner in the UK. In fact, Roast turkey didn’t become a popular menu item until about 1851 when it replaced the traditional Christmas dinner entrée, roast swan. However, the Royal Family enjoyed the ever popular Boars head as the main course for a few more decades.

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Christmas is full of symbols, with the humble Candy Cane being one of the most popular and one of the most controversial. Some say the Candy Cane originally dates back to the year 1670 in Europe and signifies the shape of the hook that Jesus used to shepherd his sheep with the red and white stripes indicating purity and the sacrifice of Christ. However according to some the significance of the Candy Cane remains the same, but was created by a candy maker in Illinois.